Long Distance E-Bike Riding Numbers

On Electric Bike Report Gary Corbett gives some interesting numbers pertaining to his record breaking E-Bike ride.

The single most striking number is the number of times that access to battery charging (a socket) was refused along the 27800 km of riding. It happened twice. This sounds about right to me. While I usually ride less distance than the battery allows between natural charging times there have been occasions where it has felt “wise” to plug it in at some point along the way and nobody has ever been less than helpful.

Also interesting are the range figures quoted. 39.95 km out of a full battery charge on a Haibike XDURO Trekking sounds about right for a laden bike on hilly terrain. It certainly should not be a lot less.

95.2 km out of a 400 Wh battery and 114 km out of a 500 Wh battery on the other hand sounds spectacularly good but given frugal use of higher power modes and favourable wind and terrain I can just about believe it.

The worst cycle track they encountered is listed as National Route 1 on the east coast of England, “a national disgrace”. I have personally never cycled this route but I have encountered stretches of National Cycle Routes often enough and I am slowly learning… The pictures on local authority websites, of grandmothers riding with grandchildren on idyllic paths, have tempted me to give them a try more than once and I don’t think I have ever enjoyed it. Particularly on Route 5 close to Oxford there are parts where there was obviously funding to set up / pave the route at some point but no maintenance has been done since resulting in some spectacularly bad surfaces best left to people riding 160mm travel full suspension mountain bikes if not in fact off-road vehicles. National Cycle Route 5 – 3/10 – Must try harder.

E-Bikes on the Rise

E-Bikes have been around for a few years now and they are becoming increasingly popular. When started riding mine at the beginning of 2015 I would only very rarely seen another person on an E-Bike in and around Oxford. Now, summer of 2016, I see one or two almost every single day and most of these are quite nice models. I fully expect that this time next year they will be an increasingly common sight.

In the Netherlands where the E-Bike market is a little more advanced the industry association RAI quoted the year on year ’14/’15 increase in E-Bike unit sales as being about 24%, making for about 20% of the whole Dutch bicycle market. The year on year growth ’14/’15 figure for the UK is quoted as being similar around 25% although a quick look around on the road would suggest E-Bikes have yet to account for 20% of new(wish) bikes on the road. In that regard we have a little catching up to do.

My own E-Bike is a Touring model with a pannier rack and mudguards, Haibike XDURO Trekking RX.

Because this particular model bike can carry significant loads and it is quite suitable for riding in wetter weather it in some ways feels like a car replacement and it has certainly ridden many miles that would otherwise have been ridden by car. I like it a lot but I have to admit that I also remain very happy with a more conventional totally human-powered drop bar bike (a GT Grade) which lacks the e-support but is lighter, more agile and somehow feels more “alive”. Also it can be recharged more easily and pleasantly.

If I could keep only one of the two bikes it would be a very hard decision to make as to which one to keep and which one should go. In reality I would probably keep the Haibike E-Bike as is so practical and it still brings much of the fun of cycling but I would really miss that GT Grade so I really will try to keep both for now.

NLTV2 iPhone App #1 Dutch News App

A couple of days ago our Dutchclasser’s Iphone App went live in the iTunes App store. It is now the #1 Paid for App in the News & Current Affairs section of the Dutch App store having overtaken even the BBC App which is at #3.

NLTV is Number One
NLTV2 is Number One

The first update of this App is already in the works and apparently those of us with iPhones and iPods are supposed to help test it… again. Maybe he will make us a Dutch homework App next so we too can impress when classes start again after the holiday.

Dutch News iPhone App with NOS Journaal

One of our Dutchclassers has now written an iPhone App to aid in learning Dutch and in the spirit of true Dutchness has also placed this app for sale on the Apple App Store. The App is called NLTV2 and it allows the user to watch the latest podcasts of a number of Dutch news and current affairs programmes by streaming them directly to an iPhone or iPod touch. No need to download or sync podcasts, the App just streams the material directly to your iPhone.

NLTV2 can stream both the NOS Journaal and the NOS Jeugdjournaal. The Dutch main news programme and the version of the news for younger watchers. Unsurprisingly the Jeugdjournaal is easier to watch and understand for Dutch learners but a lot of the normal Journaal can be gathered too even if you do get bizarre moments like watching Nigel Farrage being interviewed (in English) with Dutch subtitles.

We are actually rather impressed. Now if only we could understand all of that Dutch.

Before the NOS Journaal is Podcast …

A few months ago DutchClass.co.uk mentioned the availability of Dutch news as NOS Journaal Podcasts. Since then I’ve been watching Dutch news podcasts now and then- not every day, but enough to help me learn a bit more useful and up-to-date Dutch.

Imagine my surprise to receive from a Dutch friend a link to the YouTube clip below:

This is a fun and fascinating (!) insight into preparations for Dutch news broadcasts. Enjoy !

NOS Journaal Podcast

There’s good news for students of Dutch language who do not have access to Dutch television. The Dutch evening new programme NOS Journaal is now available as a podcast.

Obviously it’s a great advantage to be able to watch and listen to “real life” (as opposed to purely “teaching materials”) Dutch media. The facility to download and view NOS Journaal as a video podcast makes this Dutch news programme available to all users of iTunes (though a PC or MAC computer). If you are lucky enough to have a video iPod or an iPhone it may be even more convenient to watch NOS Journaal while out and about, travelling, in cafes, or wherever you go.

To subscribe to the NOS Journaal video podcast open iTunes and goto the iTunes store to browse podcasts. NOS Journaal is free to subscribe to and very easy to find. I used the search term “NOS Journaal”. You might also want to browse other Dutch language podcasts (by specifying the language as “Dutch”).

Introductory overview of the Dutch Language

Inspired by the earlier entry on DutchClass.co.uk featuring “YouTube as a Dutch Learning Aid ?”, I’m still checking back to YouTube for more gems about the Dutch Language.

Here’s a slightly more academic look at recognising a page of text as Dutch, as opposed to say German. It is presented by American academic Prof. Alexander Arguelles. After watching the following clip and also visiting Prof. Arguelles’ page on YouTube I’ll certainly be watching more of his material.

The above is extremely simple. It just compares Dutch with English and German, and refers to other Germanic languages only collectively – without actually naming any others. However this clip is part of a series and, being an early “episode”, there must be a good chance that future entries about recognising other languages will include comparisons with Dutch.

If you found this as interesting as I did you might also want to visit Prof. Arguelles’s page on YouTube to read more about his approach thoughts on learning teaching and learning languages.

Hebben

The verb “hebben” (which means “to have” in English) is an irregular verb that has many uses. It is one of the most important Dutch verbs.

The Simple Present Tense forms of “Hebben”

           
  Dutch   English  
         
Singular ik heb I have
hij / zij / het (‘t) heeft he / she / it has
je / jij hebt you (informal*) have
u hebt you (formal*) have
         
Plural wij hebben we have
jullie hebben you (informal*) have
u hebt you (formal*) have
zij hebben they have
       
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik heb een hond.. I have a dog.
* Zij heeft een baan. She has a job.
* Je hebt een huis. You have a house.
* Wij hebben een auto. We have a car.
* Jullie hebben tid. You (all) have time.
* Zij hebben te veel tid. They have too much time.

The Simple Past Tense forms of “Hebben”

           
  Dutch   English  
         
Singular ik had I had
hij / zij / het (‘t) had he / she / it had
je / jij had you (informal*) had
u had you (formal*) had
         
Plural wij hadden we had
jullie hadden you (informal*) had
u had you (formal*) had
zij hadden they had
       
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Gisteren had ik te veel werk. Yesterday I had too much work.
* Zij had mazelen. She had measles.
* Gisteren hadden wij plezier op het
kermisterrein.
Yesterday we had fun at the fairground.
* U had een belangrijke invitatie. You (formal+plural) had an important
invitation.
* Zij hadden vorige week tijd. They had time last week.

The Perfect Tense forms of “Hebben”

           
  Dutch   English  
         
Singular ik heb … gehad I have had …
hij / zij / het (‘t) heeft … gehad he / she / it has had …
je / jij hebt … gehad you (informal*) have had …
u hebt … gehad you (formal*) have had …
         
Plural wij hebben … gehad we have had …
jullie hebben … gehad you (informal*) have had …
u hebt … gehad you (formal*) have had …
zij hebben … gehad they have had …
       
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik heb te veel zon gehad. I have had too much sun.
* Hij heeft een gesprek met haar
gehad.
He has had a conversation with
her.
* Zij heeft een schok gehad. She has had a shock.
* Wij hebben een goede vakantie gehad. We have had a good holiday.
* Jullie hebben en lange pauze gehad. You (all) have had a long rest.
* Zij hebben wijn met hun avondeten
gehad.
They have had wine with their dinner.

The Future Tense forms of “Hebben” (using “zullen”)

The Dutch verb zullen is used to in conjunction with another verb (in this case “hebben”), to refer to actions in the future in much the same way as the words “will”, or “shall” are used in English, e.g. “I will have something tomorrow”, or “I shall have something tomorrow”. However, in English these words are often simplified in everyday speech to: “I’ll have something tomorrow”.

           
  Dutch   English  
         
Singular ik zal … hebben I will/shall have …
hij / zij / het (‘t) zal … hebben he / she / it will/shall have …
je / jij zult … hebben you (informal*) will/shall have …
u zal … hebben you (formal*) will/shall have …
         
Plural wij zullen … hebben we will/shall have …
jullie zullen … hebben you (informal*) will/shall have …
u zullen … hebben you (formal*) will/shall have …
zij zullen … hebben they will/shall have …
       
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik zal op dinsdag ontbijt met u
hebben.
I will have breakfast with you on
Tuesday.
* Hij zal onvoldoende tijd hebben
om dat te beëindigen.
He will have insufficient time
to finish that.
* Wij zullen een mooie tijd aan de
kust hebben.
We will have a nice time at the
coast.
* U zult het op vrijdag hebben. You (formal+singular) will
have it on Friday.
* Zij zullen rode handboeken volgend
jaar hebben.
They will have red textbooks next
year.

The Future Tense forms of “Hebben” (using “gaan”)

The Dutch verb gaan may be used to in conjunction with another verb (in this case “hebben”), to refer to actions in the future the same way as the verb “go” in English, e.g. “I am going to have something tomorrow”.

           
  Dutch   English  
         
Singular ik ga … hebben I am going to have …
hij / zij / het (‘t) gaat … hebben he / she / it is going to have …
je / jij gaat … hebben you (informal*) are going to have …
u gaat … hebben you (formal*) are going to have …
         
Plural wij gaan … hebben we are going to have …
jullie gaan … hebben you (informal*) are going to have …
u gaat … hebben you (formal*) are going to have …
zij gaan … hebben they are going to have …
       
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik ga het in ieder geval hebben. I am going to have it anyway.
* Hij gaat de dag van volgende woensdag
hebben.
He is going to have the day off
next Wednesday.
* Wij gaan thee met onze vrienden
hebben.
We are going to have tea with our
friends.
* Jullie gaan te veel werk hebben
om te doen.
You (informal+plural) are going
to have too much work to do.
* Zij gaan een rit op een trein hebben. They are going to have a ride on
a train.

In case you would like to print this posting we have made it available to download easily. Just click here: Print the Page “Hebben”.

Bijvoeglijk naamwoord / Adjectieven

Dit artikel is over adjectieven die mensen beschrijven mensen of hoe mensen zich voelen. De meeste van deze woorden kunnen ook op dieren of zelfs op voorwerpen toegepast. (De woordenlijst onder geeft de Nederlandse woorden in alfabetische volgorde.)

Hier zijn twaalf voorbeelden met enige van deze adjectieven in de tegenwoordige tijd:

  1. Ik ben in Oxford.
  2. De advocaat is erg serieus.
  3. De clown is altijd grappig.
  4. Onze leraar is inspirerend.
  5. De meisjes in de klas zijn beleefd.
  6. De jongens in de klas zijn ongehoorzaam.
  7. Ze is zenuwachtig voor het examen.
  8. Mijn kat is erg lief.
  9. Mijn secretaris is onmisbaar.
  10. Wij zijn gelukkig tijdens de vakanties.
  11. Het kind is omzichtig met vreemden.
  12. Heel kleine poesjes zijn onhandig.

Woordenlijst

aardig
beleefd
boos
dik
doodop
druk
dun
eerlijk
gelukkig
grappig
hoffelijk
huiverig
ijverig
inspirerend
knap
lief
moe
omzichtig
onaardig
oneerlijk
ongehoorzaam
ongelukkig
ongerust
ongetrouwd
onhandig
onmisbaar
onrealistisch
onvriendelijk
pietluttig
realistisch
romantisch
serieus
stil
verdrietig
verwonderd
vriendelijk
vrolijk
zenuwachtig
kind / nice / friendly
polite / courteous
angry / cross / hostile
thick / fat / bulky
tired-out / worn out / washed-out
busy / active / lively
thin / slender
honest / fair / sincere
happy / lucky / fortunate
funny / amusing
polite / courteous
hesitant / wary
diligent / industrious
inspiring
clever / bright / smart / good-looking
friendly / cute
tired
cautious / circumspect /prudent
unpleasant / unfriendly / unkind
dishonest / unfair
disobedient
unhappy / unlucky / unfortunate
worried / anxious
unmarried / single
clumsy / awkward
indispensable
unrealistic
unfriendly
meticulous / petty / niggling
realistic
romantic
serious / straight
quiet / silent
sad / grieved
surprised / amazed / astonished
friendly / kind / amiable
cheerful / merry
nervous / jittery

In case you would like to print this posting we have made it available to download easily. Just click here: Print the page “Adjectieven”.

Zijn

The verb “zijn” (which means “to be” in English) is an irregular verb that has many uses. It is one of the most important Dutch verbs.

The Simple Present Tense forms of “Zijn”

Dutch English
Singular ik ben I am
hij / zij / het (‘t) is he / she / it is
je / jij bent you (informal*) are
u bent you (formal*) are
Plural wij zijn we are
jullie zijn you (informal*) are
u bent you (formal*) are
zij zijn they are
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik ben moe. I am tired.
* Zij is in Londen. She is in London.
* Je bent niet serieus! You are not serious !
* Wij zijn gelukkig. We are happy.
* Jullie zijn te omzichtig. You (all) are too cautious.
* Zij zijn vrolijk ! They are cheerful !

The Simple Past Tense forms of “Zijn”

Dutch English
Singular ik was I was
hij / zij / het (‘t) was he / she / it was
je / jij was you (informal*) were
u was you (formal*) were
Plural wij waren we were
jullie waren you (informal*) were
u was you (formal*) were
zij waren they were
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik was niet hier. I was not here.
* Zij was de hele week in Amsterdam. She was in Amsterdam all week.
* Wij waren in augustus op vakantie. We were on holiday in August.
* U was op vrijdag hier. You (formal+plural) were here on
Friday.
* Zij waren gelukkig mar moe. They were happy but tired.

The Perfect Tense forms of “Zijn”

Dutch English
Singular ik ben … geweest I have been …
hij / zij / het (‘t) is … geweest he / she / it has been …
je / jij bent … geweest you (informal*) have been …
u bent … geweest you (formal*) have been …
Plural wij zijn … geweest we have been …
jullie zijn … geweest you (informal*) have been …
u bent … geweest you (formal*) have been …
zij zijn … geweest they have been …
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik ben in Frankrijk geweest. I have been to France.
* Hij is niet in Duitsland geweest. He has not been to Germany.
* Zij is ongerust om haar hond geweest. She has been worried about her
dog.
* Wij zijn erg ijverig geweest. We have been very diligent.
* Jullie zijn erg gulzig geweest. You (all) have been very greedy.
* Zij zijn ziek geweest. They have been sick.

The Future Tense forms of “Zijn” (using “zullen”)

The Dutch verb zullen is used to in conjunction with another verb (in this case “zijn”), to refer to actions in the future in much the same way as the words “will”, or “shall” are used in English, e.g. “I will do something tomorrow”, or “I shall do something tomorrow”. However, in English these words are often simplified in everyday speech to: “I’ll do something tomorrow”.

Dutch English
Singular ik zal … zijn I will/shall be …
hij / zij / het (‘t) zal … zijn he / she / it will/shall be …
je / jij zult … zijn you (informal*) will/shall be …
u zult … zijn you (formal*) will/shall be …
Plural wij zullen … zijn we will/shall be …
jullie zullen … zijn you (informal*) will/shall be …
u zult … zijn you (formal*) will/shall be …
zij zullen … zijn they will/shall be …
* These are the same in English.

Examples:

* Ik zal morgen in Oxford zijn. I will be in Oxford tomorrow.
* Hij zal volgende week verwonderd
zijn.
He will be surprised next week.
* Wij zullen vanavond doodop zijn. We will be tired-out tonight.
* Zij zullen op donderdag hier zijn.. They will be here on Thursday.

In case you would like to print this posting we have made it available to download easily. Just click here: Print the page “Zijn”.